David Enlow, Organist

“strong and compelling … arresting … outstanding." —The American Organist

About

David Enlow, hailed for his "enormous virtuosity" (Stuttgarter Zeitung), "arresting performances" (The American Organist) and his "nimble accounts full of singing detail” (Choir & Organ), is a concert organist and church musician who performs and teaches across North America and Europe. His recordings include Pater Seraphicus, a three-disc set of the Franck organ works, Piano á l’orgue, an album of piano transcriptions, and Bach on Park Avenue, recorded at New York’s Church of St. Ignatius Loyola.

Mr. Enlow is organist and choir master at the Church of the Resurrection in New York, where he directs a professional choir that offers over fifty settings of the mass each season, often works of Mozart and Haydn with orchestra. He is also a member of the organ faculty of the Juilliard School, where he is responsible for the service-playing component of the curriculum. Active in the American Guild of Organists (AGO), Mr. Enlow is dean of the AGO’s New York City Chapter, has served on its national professional certification committee, and continues on its board of examiners. His work in early music includes serving as organist of the Clarion Orchestra and as répétiteur of the Clarion Choir, the highly acclaimed ensembles. Mr. Enlow regularly offers lectures, workshops, and concerts for chapter, regional, and national gatherings of the AGO and the Royal Canadian College of Organists.

david at console

He holds both bachelor’s and master's degrees from the Juilliard School, where he studied with Paul Jacobs and John Weaver. Mr. Enlow also studied at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia, and with John Tuttle in Toronto. Mr. Enlow’s national first prizes for performance include those of the Arthur Poister Competition and the Albert Schweitzer Organ Festival/USA.

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The Canadian organist literally pulled out all the stops, including [the zimbelstern], in Henri Mulet's Carillon-Sortie, a performer's delight which attested to Mr. Enlow's enormous virtuosity. Virtuosity marked the program from the outset in Bach's Toccata and Fugue in F major. Enlow shaped the monumental Toccata into a multi-hued showpiece complete with lively pedal-work which contrasted with the gravitas of the fugue.— Stuttgarter Zeitung

Watch & Listen

"Commanding" - The New Yorker
"immense virtuosity" —Stuttgarter Zeitung
"sensitive ... dramatic ... masterful" —The AAM Journal
"crisp ... superb ... gutsy" —Organ Canada

Enlow’s performance style is often improvisatory, capturing in a unique way the manner in which Franck himself may have performed. Enlow demonstrates a keen sensitivity to line and phrase, employing copious amounts of rhythmic nuance, … highlighting or underlining phrase structures.”
— James Hildreth, The American Organist

Calendar

2016-17 Season

Friday, January 20th, 7:30 pm
St. Petersburg College, Fl.
Organ concert

Saturday, February 11th, 9 am-12 noon
Providence, Rhode Island AGO
Improvisation/Service Playing Workshop

Sunday, March 26th, 4pm
Westchester Chapter AGO,
Improvisation/Service Playing Workshop
Irvington Presbyterian Church
25 N. Broadway, Irvington, NY

Sunday, April 30th
Madison Avenue Presbyterian Church
John Weaver Birthday Concert
with Paul Jacobs, Andrew Henderson, & MAPC Choir

Tuesday, May 9th, 8pm
Church of the Resurrection, New York
Organ concert

Saturday, May 20th, 2pm
St. Norbert’s Abbey, De Pere, Wis.
Organ concert

Saturday, May 26th
Duruflé Requiem & choral concert
Jubilate Ensemble, Vancouver, B.C.

Wednesday, July 19th
St. David's Cathedral, Wales
Organ concert

Friday, July 21st
Skinner-Orgel,
Ingelheim (Frankfurt), German

Sunday, July 23rd
Cannstatter Orgelsommer
Stuttgart, Germany

Sunday, July 30th
Pfarrkirche St. Erasmus, Steinach-am-Brenner, Austria
Organ concert

Sunday, August 6th
Graz Cathedral, Austria
Organ concert

2018

Friday, March 9th
Catalina Organ Festival
Tucson, Ariz.

Even more striking than his technical brilliance are the Canadian's imaginative and rapid registration changes, which make him an artist of interest. The whirring dance of Louis Vierne's “Naïades,” glimmering from within the closed Swell box, played a delightful contrast to Mozart's Fantasie in f minor. — Stuttgarter Zeitung, August 2012

Press

Review of Piano a l'Orgue
Choir and Organ, January-February 2016 by Michael Quinn

“There’s something delightfully dreamy about this David Enlow recital of works originally composed for piano. The III/49 Opus 665 Casavant organ of New York’s Church of the Resurrection (built in 1916 and ‘re-purposed’ by the Organ Clearing House in 2009) is a gorgeous, light-textured, nuanced instrument that treats Debussy’s Verlaine-inspired Petite suite to gossamer-delicate lyricism and the second Arabesque with enchanting playfulness. Grieg’s Holberg Suite benefits from the use of the organ’s more full-bodied reed colours throughout, with the original piano figuration in the ‘Prelude’ creating a rush of fleet-footed chords. The Six Canonic Studies for Pedal-Piano by Schumann ebb and flow between symphonic scale and chamber intimacy, Enlow delivering nimble accounts full of singing detail..”

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Recital, Karlsruhe, Germany 2015
BNN Karlsruhe, August 2015 by Jens Wehn, translated by Michael König

In the third concert of the International Organ Summer, organist David Enlow filled both instruments with life. With his boisterously moving transcription of Claude Debussy's "Petite Suite", enthusiastically received by the audience, David Enlow bade farewell to his listeners, who didn't let him leave the organ bench without an encore.”

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Review of Pater Seraphicus
from The American Organist, October 2013 by James Hildreth

“Enlow’s performance style is often improvisatory, capturing in a unique way the manner in which Franck himself may have performed. Enlow demonstrates a keen sensitivity to line and phrase, employing copious amounts of rhythmic nuance, … highlighting or underlining phrase structures.”

“While Enlow plays with a sense of freedom, his tempos are strong and compelling, whether expansive, lingering, poetic, or energetic, driving, agitato. The loving tenderness he imparts to the central melodies of the Choral in A Minor and Grand Pièce Symphonique, or the impetuous drive of the “storm” section of the Pastorale or the main theme of the Choral in A Minor are but a few of the myriad examples of Enlow’s arresting performances.”

“Enlow has successfully and brilliantly achieved his goals here. One can easily find excellent recordings of the Franck works … However, this remains an outstanding choice among the plethora of recordings of Franck’s organ music.”

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from l’Orgue Francophone (Journal of Federation Francophone des Amis de l’Orgue)

Pater Seraphicus, the major organ works of Franck by David Enlow at the organ of St Mary the Virgin, Times Square, New York City. [Pro Organo CD 7247 ; 3 CD] At first hearing, the entry of the reeds is surprising, or even confusing, as their character is very different to that which our ears are accustomed to. We must over-ride that, and put aside our Franck-ist and Symphonic atavism. David Enlow truly has much to say in the works of Franck, which he has perfectly comprehended and which he renders with personal expression while remaining faithful to the spirit of Franck. This approach is well suited to American organs, especially the Church of St Mary the Virgin in New York (Aeolian-Skinner Op. 891, 1932, revised and augmented from 1988-2002 by Mann & Trupiano) is a gem.

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from l'Orgue, Décembre 2012
by Georges Cattin, Translation: Monique Dori

…the interpreter of this Franck set is David Enlow, graduate of the best American schools. He is a pure example of what the U.S. can offer, for an organist, at its best: perfect technique, inventive, flexible, vigorous musicality, free of conventions of registration that often make Franck's music so boring on the Old Continent.

In short, we have here all the ingredients of a lively rendering neither too fast nor too powerful, with magnificent reed colors, a sense of phrasing of extraordinary good taste and a subtle and effective rubato. Compared with the two very beautiful sets of Franck works mentioned above, we are here in a state of total surprise at a happy encounter with a joyfully revitalized.

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from Mixtures, la Fédération Québécoise des Amis de l'Orgue, Nov 2012
by Robert Poliquin

"Without a doubt, the artist has a flawless technique. His reading of the different works is remarkable, and is reflected in his playing."

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Review of an RCCO Convention Solo Recital
from Organ Canada, September 2014 by Gilles Leclerc

“Sometimes things are lost in any transcription from one medium to another. Other times such undertakings are so well done, … that one can rediscover a work’s sheer beauty. Enlow’s transcription of this [Holberg] Suite was just such a delight, and most striking about his performance were the innumerable shadings he displayed with his most effective registrations.”

“David Enlow’s minute attention to nuances, shaping of phrases, tempos, and overall forward motion, not to mention the perfect registrations, made this the most poetic rendering of [Franck’s Grande Pièce Symphonique] I ever heard.”

“David Enlow understands the music he performs, respects its narrative but manages to delve further into the score with his incredible sense of expressiveness and sense of musical form.”

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David Enlow in recital, at Orgelsommer festival in the Collegiate Church – Translation: Ethan Fran
from Stuttgarter Zeitung, August 2012 by Markus Dippold

Give an audience an impressive finale, and their roaring approval is guaranteed. This assertion was proven by David Enlow at the Collegiate Church. The Canadian organist literally pulled out all the stops, including [the zimbelstern], in Henri Mulet's Carillon-Sortie, a performer's delight which attested to Mr. Enlow's enormous virtuosity. Virtuosity marked the program from the outset in Bach's Toccata and Fugue in F major. Enlow shaped the monumental Toccata into a multi-hued showpiece complete with lively pedal-work which contrasted with the gravitas of the fugue (...).

Even more striking than his technical brilliance are the Canadian's imaginative and rapid registration changes, which make him an artist of interest. The whirring dance of Louis Vierne's “Naïades,” glimmering from within the closed Swell box, played a delightful contrast to Mozart's Fantasie in f minor. This play of alternating styles and sound effects is a major element of Enlow's interpretations. This applies on the one hand to the dramaturgy of his programming, which alternates symphonic-romantic pieces with simpler compositions. On the other hand it also applies to each separate work, within which Enlow searches out the most varied colorations possible, exploiting the full resources of the Collegiate Church organ. Such is his treatment of the Mozart Fantasie, particularly of its dynamic effects, in which he transfers the principles of Mozart's symphonic orchestrations onto this organ work.

From an audience perspective, however, it was his ‘Improvised Suite’ on anonymously submitted themes that was perhaps the most fun to listen to. Enlow highlighted the strengths of the instrument in a meditative Finnish folk song during the ‘Prelude’ section and tackled Gustav Holst’s melodious tune ‘Thaxted’ in the splendid ‘Cantabile’ movement. My favourite part was the clever finale, a double fugue that combined ‘O Canada’ and ‘God save the Queen’. This was a real treat, especially the rousing end which managed, at least for a few seconds, to transform the sanctuary into an Olympic stadium with the audience cheering for the medal contender. —Organ Canada, September 2012

Gallery

Images below are available for publicity use.

In the third concert of the International Organ Summer, organist David Enlow filled both instruments with life. With his boisterously moving transcription of Claude Debussy's "Petite Suite", enthusiastically received by the audience, David Enlow bade farewell to his listeners, who didn't let him leave the organ bench without an encore.—BNN Karlsruhe, Germany, August 2015

Franck CDs

cd cover

David Enlow plays César Franck
PATER SERAPHICUS A THREE-DISC SET
Purchase at proorgano.com or by calling toll-free: 800-336-2224
Sponsored by the Welsh Church of New York

…the interpreter of this Franck set is David Enlow, graduate of the best American schools. He is a pure example of what the U.S. can offer. . . perfect technique, inventive, flexible, vigorous musicality, free of conventions of registration that often make Franck's music so boring on the Old Continent. — l'Orgue, Décembre 2012

 

Piano a l'Orgue

cd cover

David Enlow plays transcriptions at the Church of the Resurrection, New York
PIANO A L’ORGUE
Purchase at proorgano.com or by calling toll-free: 800-336-2224

…There’s something delightfully dreamy about this David Enlow recital of works originally composed for piano. — Choir and Organ, January 2016

 

Bach on Park Avenue

cd cover

David Enlow plays Bach at the church of St. Ignatius Loyola, New York
BACH ON PARK AVENUE
Purchase at proorgano.com or by calling toll-free: 800-336-2224

Contact

For recital, lessons, coaching, and AGO Examination Prep,
please email or call: 212-535-9666 ext 31